2017 Sea-Air-Space Expo

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of the 2017 Sea-Air-Space Expo.

Follow this page for live video and updates from the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in National Harbor, Maryland, April 3-5.

The Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space Exposition was founded in 1965 as a means to bring the U.S. defense industrial base, U.S. private-sector companies and key military decision makers together for an annual innovative, educational, professional and maritime-based event. Sea-Air-Space is the largest maritime exposition in the U.S. and continues as an invaluable extension of the Navy League’s mission of maritime policy education and sea service support.

Monday

8:45 to 10:15 a.m. EDT: Sea Services Update

Watch the webcast here.

Moderator

  • Bradley Peniston
    Deputy Editor, DefenseOne

Panelists

  • ADM William F. Moran
    Vice Chief of Naval Operations
  • Gen. Glenn M. Walters, USMC
    Assistant Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps
  • ADM Charles D. Michel, USCG
    Vice Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard
  • Mr. Joel Szabat
    Executive Director, Maritime Transportation (on behalf of Administrator)

10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. EDT:
Interoperability and Distributed Operations

10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. EDT:
Interoperability and Distributed Operations

Moderator

  • Bryan McGrath
    Hudson Institute

Panelists

  • Bill Williford
    Executive Director, Marine Corps Systems Command
  • VADM Sandra Stotz, USCG
    Deputy Commandant, Mission Support
  • VADM Paul A. Grosklags, USN
    Commander, NAVAIR
  • VADM Thomas J. Moore, USN
    Commander, NAVSEA
  • RADM Christian D. Becker, USN
    Commander, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command

2 to 3:15 p.m. EDT:
Innovation for Operational Excellence

2 to 3:15 p.m. EDT:
Innovation for Operational Excellence

Moderator

  • Emily Harman
    Director Office of Small Business Programs

Panelists

  • Vice Adm. Jonathan Woodcock, OBE (Confirmed)
    Second Sea Lord, Royal Navy
  • Lt. Gen. Robert S. Walsh, USMC (Confirmed)
    Deputy Commandant for Combat Development and Integration
  • Rear Adm. Joseph M. Vojvodich, USCG (Confirmed)
    Assistant Commandant for Acquisition and Chief Acquisition Officer (CG-9)
  • Rear Adm. David J. Hahn, USN (Confirmed)
    Chief of Naval Research, Director of Innovation, Technology Requirements, Test and Evaluation (ONR)
  • Vice Adm. Phillip Cullom, USN (Confirmed)
    Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics (OPNAV N4)

3:30 to 5 p.m. EDT:
Strengthening Partnerships Through Innovation, Experimentation and Interoperability

3:30 to 5 p.m. EDT:
Strengthening Partnerships Through Innovation, Experimentation and Interoperability

Moderator

  • Vice Adm. Krause
    Commander, Germany Navy

Panelists

  • Vice Adm. Kari Takanen
    Commander, Finnish Navy
  • Vice Adm. Valter Girardelli
    Chief, Italian Navy
  • Rear Adm. John Martin
    Chief of Navy, New Zealand
  • Rear Adm. Lars Saunes
    Chief, Royal Norwegian Navy

Stopping Sexual Assault – Not Just in April

The truth is, the vast majority of Airmen we serve alongside have never – and will never – sexually assault another person in their lifetime. Let me say it again for the people in the back – the vast majority of our Airmen HAVE NEVER and WILL NEVER harm another person. Hard stop.

10 Things to know about U.S. Navy Chiefs

Effectively running and fighting a warship relies on bridging the gap between officers and enlisted personnel. It was from this need that the creation of the rank of chief petty officer was born.

The chief petty officer as it is recognized today was officially established April 1, 1893. Armed with official recognition, chiefs of the past went on to lay the foundation for their modern day counterparts.

Below are 10 things that you should know about U.S. Navy chief petty officers.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2016) Fiscal Year 2017 chief petty officers stand at attention during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2016) Fiscal Year 2017 chief petty officers stand at attention during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Gaines/Released)

1. The earliest known use of the title “chief” dates back to 1776 when Jacob Wasbie, a cook’s mate, was pronounced “Chief Cook” aboard USS Alfred. The title was largely informal and was used to denote him as the foremost cook aboard the ship.

NAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan: Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Casey Clark, assigned to Navy Munitions Command East Asia Division (NMCEAD) Atsugi, receives his combination cover during the chief petty officer pinning ceremony held at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi's Cinema 77. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason Bawgus/Released)
NAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan: Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Casey Clark, assigned to Navy Munitions Command East Asia Division (NMCEAD) Atsugi, receives his combination cover during the chief petty officer pinning ceremony held at Naval Air Facility (NAF) Atsugi’s Cinema 77. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason Bawgus/Released)

2. Since 1797, only two ratings for chiefs that have remained in continuous use are boatswain’s mate and gunner’s mate.

MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 9, 2016) – Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate Mumira Ferah from San Jose, Calif., gives instructions aboard USS Ross (DDG 71) during a replenishment at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) Aug. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Aug. 9, 2016) – Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate Mumira Ferah from San Jose, Calif., gives instructions aboard USS Ross (DDG 71) during a replenishment-at-sea with the Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Big Horn (T-AO 198) Aug. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold/Released)

3. On March 21, 1917, Loretta Walsh became the first woman Navy petty officer when sworn in as a chief yeoman.

PACIFIC OCEAN (April 1, 2014) Chief Ship’s Serviceman Barbara Lynch, left, Chief Cryptologic Technician Technical Ashley Jones, Chief Information Systems Technician Warren Quiambao, and Chief Legalman Justin Wheeler demonstrate the wear of chief petty officer uniforms throughout history. The chief petty officer grade was first established April 1, 1893 by Navy General Order 409. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/ Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (April 1, 2014) Chief Ship’s Serviceman Barbara Lynch, left, Chief Cryptologic Technician Technical Ashley Jones, Chief Information Systems Technician Warren Quiambao, and Chief Legalman Justin Wheeler demonstrate the wear of chief petty officer uniforms throughout history. (U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/ Released)

4. The advent of a rocker device was the first distinction and was originally borrowed from the master-at-arms rating and became official in 1894. The foul anchor cap device was approved in 1905, and collar devices became official in 1959.

WASHINGTON (April 1, 2015) Command Master Chief Christian Detje, assigned to the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard, stands at ease during a celebration of the 122nd birthday of the chief petty officer rank at the United States Navy Memorial. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)
WASHINGTON (April 1, 2015) Command Master Chief Christian Detje, assigned to the United States Navy Ceremonial Guard, stands at ease during a celebration of the 122nd birthday of the chief petty officer rank at the United States Navy Memorial. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

5. By 1941, all chief petty officers were authorized to wear khaki working uniforms. ALNAV 16 (Feb. 21, 1941) authorized khaki working uniforms for all chief petty officers and officers serving on all ships and shore stations.

SASEBO, Japan: Chief Navy Counselor Bethany Hale passes through sideboys after being pinned chief petty officer at the Career Education Center aboard Commander, U.S. Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David R. Krigbaum/Released)
SASEBO, Japan: Chief Navy Counselor Bethany Hale passes through sideboys after being pinned chief petty officer at the Career Education Center aboard Commander, U.S. Fleet Activities Sasebo. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David R. Krigbaum/Released)

6. There are approximately 30,000+ chief, senior chief and master chief petty officers in the Navy.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2014) Chief petty officers assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, and Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, stand in ranks with the Chiefs Mess after they are pinned in the hangar bay aboard Carl Vinson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)
PACIFIC OCEAN (Sept. 16, 2014) Chief petty officers assigned to the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17, and Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, stand in ranks with the Chiefs Mess after they are pinned in the hangar bay aboard Carl Vinson. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class George M. Bell/Released)

7. A chief petty officer is equivalent to a gunnery sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps, sergeant first class in the U.S. Army, and a master sergeant in the U.S. Air Force.

Gunnery Sgt. Corey Hall participates in a CPO 365 Phase II drill and cadence event during CPO Pride Week 2016 in Pearl Hawaii, Sept. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Johans Chavarro/Released)
Gunnery Sgt. Corey Hall participates in a CPO 365 Phase II drill and cadence event during CPO Pride Week 2016 in Pearl Hawaii, Sept. 9, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Johans Chavarro/Released)

8. U.S. Navy chief petty officers are afforded more responsibility than any other enlisted rank in the world.

Chiefs combination covers lay displayed on a table prior to the arrival of the U.S. Navy's newest Chief Petty Officers, Sept. 19, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary A. Prill (RELEASED))
Chiefs combination covers lay displayed on a table prior to the arrival of the U.S. Navy’s newest chief petty officers, Sept. 19, 2009. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Gary A. Prill/Released)

9. More than 50 chief petty officers have been awarded the Medal of Honor.

WASHINGTON (Feb. 29, 2016) President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward C. Byers Jr. during a ceremony at the White House. Byers received the Medal of Honor for his actions during a hostage rescue operation in December 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Oscar Sosa/Released)
WASHINGTON (Feb. 29, 2016) President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Senior Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Edward C. Byers Jr. during a ceremony at the White House. Byers received the Medal of Honor for his actions during a hostage rescue operation in December 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Oscar Sosa/Released)

10. On average, Sailors advance to chief petty officer in about 13 years of active duty.

EVERETT, Wash. (Sept. 14, 2012) Newly-pinned chief petty officers salute during a chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Grand Vista Ballroom at Naval Station Everett. The Naval Station welcomed 24 newly pinned Sailors to the rank of chief petty officer during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen/Released)
EVERETT, Wash. (Sept. 14, 2012) Newly-pinned chief petty officers salute during a chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Grand Vista Ballroom at Naval Station Everett. The Naval Station welcomed 24 newly pinned Sailors to the rank of a chief petty officer during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeffry Willadsen/Released)

 

Congratulate our chief petty officers, past and present, for their 124 years of deckplate leadership by leaving a comment below.

My Navy Chief Taught Me …

April 1 marks 124 years of deckplate leadership by our Navy chiefs. Navy General Order 409 established the rank of chief petty officer in 1893.

As we approached the birthday of the Navy chief, we asked our Facebook fans what their chief taught them about integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness. Below are some of their responses. After you’ve read them, add to the list by commenting at the end of this blog.

Cory P.:

“Integrity and accountability was the corner stone for everything. Without that, you can’t be a leader especially if no one will believe or you blame everything on others. These two things allowed you to have the toughness to be Innovative and make a change. “

ARABIAN GULF (Sept. 15, 2015) – Chief Logistics Specialist Donna Massie stands at attention after being pinned during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anna Van Nuys/Released)
ARABIAN GULF (Sept. 15, 2015) – Chief Logistics Specialist Donna Massie stands at attention after being pinned during a chief pinning ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Anna Van Nuys/Released)

Kim. R.:

“My dad is my chief, senior chief in fact! He taught me about integrity, work ethic, the importance of knowing how to swim and how to lead by example. He’s an incredible man, retired after 22 years of service, and I couldn’t be more proud to have him as my dad! “

Chief Electronics Technician Richard Strader hugs his children after being pinned as a chief petty officer at Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation Force, in Norfolk, Sept. 16, 2015. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chelsea Mandello/Released)
Chief Electronics Technician Richard Strader hugs his children after being pinned as a chief petty officer at Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation Force, in Norfolk, Sept. 16, 2015. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chelsea Mandello/Released)

Paul O.:

“The chief that made a difference in my life was when I was in deck division, hated it there – severely mismanaged bunch of misfits. Sucked all the life out of me even wanting to be in the military. Was standing watch one day as MOOW and my OOD was our QMC. He tried to talk to me about what my goals were and I told him I hated the Navy and couldn’t wait to get out. He told me that was too bad because I had a very good record and reputation around the ship. Then he said if I wanted to strike QM and work for him and give him 100% and then when it was time for me to get out and I still wanted to, he would shake my hand and thank me for everything and he’d carry my sea bag down the pier for me. It was the first time anyone believed in me and I did not want to disappoint him. That started me on a 24 year career that I loved. I retired at 2010 as a QMCS and thanked him in my retirement speech for being the difference in my career. I did all I could to do the same for my Sailors, because they were worth it.”

Quartermaster Seaman Jason Schutzman (left) and Chief Quartermaster Jory Mason, an inspector with Afloat Training Group Western Pacific, review flag signal cards prior to a flag hoist drill during the final evaluation period aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) in the South China Sea, Oct. 5, 2012.. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tatiana Avery/Released)
SOUTH CHINA SEA (Oct. 5, 2012) Quartermaster Seaman Jason SchutzmQuartermaster Seaman Jason Schutzman (left) and Chief Quartermaster Jory Mason, an inspector with Afloat Training Group Western Pacific, review flag signal cards prior to a flag hoist drill during the final evaluation period aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) in the South China Sea, Oct. 5, 2012.. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tatiana Avery/Released)an, from Pittsburgh, left, and Chief Quartermaster Jory Mason, from Chicago, an inspector with Afloat Training Group Western Pacific, review flag signal cards prior to a flag hoist drill during the final evaluation period aboard the aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Tatiana Avery/Released)

Lynnette N.:

“My chief was my father. … He taught me to stand up for myself and for what I believe. He taught me dedication, a work ethic and pride in a job well done because he served for 22 years. He remained true to the oath he took from the day he enlisted until the day he died. He showed me what it means to be an American and to honor all who serve to protect the freedoms we enjoy as Americans.”

Chief Boatswain's Mate Sorrells Claiborne (left) teaches Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Charlesa Anderson how to signal while training her as a rig captain aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during a replenishment at sea in the Arabian Sea, Jan. 13, 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman George M. Bell/Released)
Chief Boatswain’s Mate Sorrells Claiborne (left) teaches Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Charlesa Anderson how to signal while training her as a rig captain aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) during a replenishment at sea in the Arabian Sea, Jan. 13, 2012. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman George M. Bell/Released)

William G.:

“My chiefs taught me to always take responsibility for my actions and lead from the front. The old goats said I’d see chiefs and E7, 8, 9 who never would be a chief only a pay grade. Those were the ones only out for themselves and cared little about their troops. I like to think I was a chief and never forgot where I came from. Shined lots of brass and scrubbed many a deck plate with my BTs as chief. Thanks to them I had a great 27 years.”

Chief Operations Specialist Jaqueline Renteria stands watch in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in Norfolk, Jan. 10, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zach Sleeper/Released)
Chief Operations Specialist Jaqueline Renteria stands watch in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in Norfolk, Jan. 10, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Zach Sleeper/Released)

T.j. V.:

“Gotta give a huge shout out to one of the best men, best influences, most respected and one of the greatest mentors I have ever had my entire Navy career MMC Walker. Happy birthday chief! And thank you for everything you did for me while I served alongside of you. And if the calling ever came again to serve alongside of you I would proudly do so with no hesitation or questions asked. I will follow you anywhere chief! But mostly thank you and happy birthday!”

Newly-pinned chief petty officers recite the Chief Petty Officer's Pledge in the hangar bay of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during the ship's chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 16, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan N. McFarlane/Released)
Newly-pinned chief petty officers recite the Chief Petty Officer’s Pledge in the hangar bay of USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during the ship’s chief petty officer pinning ceremony in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 16, 2016. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ryan N. McFarlane/Released)

What did your Navy chief teach you about integrity, accountability, initiative and toughness? Tell us in the comments below.

AF Week in Photos

This week's photos feature Airmen from around the globe involved in activities supporting expeditionary operations and defending America. This weekly feature showcases the men and women of the Air Force.

Navy Recruit Graduation: March 31, 2017

Welcome to Navy Live blog coverage of Recruit Training Command’s graduation, Pass-In-Review. It is a formal military ceremony that honors a Sailor’s hard work and dedication to a new way of life. Pass-In-Review also ties together the future of the Navy with our long-held naval traditions and customs.

Read how Recruit Training Command transforms civilians into Sailors – 38,000 of them each year.

The live video from the Navy’s only boot camp at Great Lakes, Illinois, is scheduled to begin 8:45 a.m. CST March 31.

Congratulations Sailors and welcome aboard to the newest members of our Navy family!

Join the #USNavy conversation on social media on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, and Flickr.

Congratulate the Navy’s newest Sailors by leaving a comment below.

AF addresses pilot shortage

Lt. Gen. Gina Grosso, the Air Force manpower, personnel and services deputy chief of staff, testified on the pilot shortage before the House Armed Services subcommittee on military personnel in Washington, D.C., March 29, 2017.

Sexual assault, suicide prevention training integrate with ‘Green Dot’ approach

In 2016, the Air Force was introduced to Green Dot, an interactive training program designed to help Airmen intervene in and prevent situations of sexual and domestic violence, abuse and stalking. After conducting a pilot program with thousands of Airmen across five installations within Air Combat Command and U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Air Force officials have decided to integrate suicide prevention into Green Dot training for the Air Force.